Ordinary Objects, Extraordinary Journeys

Part exhibition, part educational tool, this
landmark project uses interactive features
to bring powerful stories to life.

Services

  • Art Direction
  • Conceptual Design
  • Copywriting
  • Geocoding Navigation
  • Hosting
  • Language Translations
  • Photography & Video
  • UX/UI
  • Website Development

Rhapsody recently worked with the Holocaust Memorial Day
Trust (HMDT), National Holocaust Centre and Museum
(NHCM) and the Jewish Museum (Greece) to develop and
create a website that uses an interactive content format,
accessibility, and clever digital features to inspire and
educate a wide range of audiences about the Holocaust.

The biggest challenge was to
do these compelling stories
justice by retelling them in an
engaging and interactive way
for generations to come

The client brief was to create a new international digital platform
that would communicate the collection, identification, and curation
of four untold Holocaust testimonies, unseen artefacts, and
previously inaccessible archival materials to an audience of adults
and young people - including teachers and their students - in an
inspiring and user-friendly way.

Rhapsody was responsible for heading the idea, creative
direction, copywriting, web development, and photography.

Our key considerations at concept stage were:

  • How to address the subject
  • The best way to portray each person’s story in a
    unique and respectful manner while also developing
    an appealing and authentic visual identity.

We then moved onto design. We knew we had to create a space
that was engaging to an audience with a wide age range and
differing levels of knowledge around the subject matter, while
making sure the meaning behind each item and journey was kept
front and centre. The challenge was to find this balance and
maintain it throughout every element of the site, from visual
design to tone of voice.

For a seamless user experience, it was imperative that site design
blended function, aesthetics, and history seamlessly. The task was
to create a navigation system that would allow the user to
navigate the narrative while engaging with artefacts, journeys,
and stories. The artefacts therefore became an essential
component of the design.

We started by photographing each person’s artefact before working
on ways to bring them to life, which included creating 360-degree
spinrounds to allow the user explore each one in detail. This then
led to honing-in on each person’s journey, and developing an
interactive map using geocoding navigation to enable users to chart
each one and gain an idea of the varying distances covered.

We then carefully selected typefaces. The body copy, caption,
and quote type are all Nocturne Serif, which was created by
Mateusz Machalski as part of https://kroje.org/. Inspired by
Warsaw and based on local typographic traditions, the typeface
was in fact the backbone of our web design, and a key element
when it came to giving the content a voice.

Tone of voice and language were workshopped with the teams from
the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, National Holocaust Centre and
Museum and the Jewish Museum of Greece to ensure all copy on
the site was informative without being intimidating, while any
potential gaps in user knowledge were addressed via the addition
of pop-out glossary boxes to prevent pages from becoming too
text-heavy.

The website was officially launched at an event attended by over
150 people - including John Hajdu MBE, survivor of the
Holocaust, who shared his personal experiences, and Enver
Solomon, Chief Executive of the Refugee Council, who discussed
refugee experiences past and present, and the relevance of
‘ordinary objects’ - and was incredibly well received.

“Rhapsody blew me away right from the moment we met
them when they pitched to us, notably how they managed
to make a wide variety of websites with different subject
matters engaging, immersive and inclusive. It was
incredible seeing our ideas for the project not just brought
to life, but enhanced, strengthened and advanced by
Rhapsody. We are so thrilled with the final result, and are
confident the website will achieve our goals – to engage
people with Holocaust education, through artefacts, and to
increase knowledge and awareness of the Holocaust. We
are already planning on adding more artefacts to the
website and look forward to continuing our relationship
with Rhapsody – if they can put up with us again!”

Dr Rachel Century – Director of Public Engagement and
Deputy Chief Executive of Holocaust Memorial Day Trust

Rhapsody recently worked with the Holocaust Memorial Day
Trust (HMDT), National Holocaust Centre and Museum
(NHCM) and the Jewish Museum (Greece) to develop and
create a website that uses an interactive content format,
accessibility, and clever digital features to inspire and
educate a wide range of audiences about the Holocaust.

The biggest challenge was to
do these compelling stories
justice by retelling them in an
engaging and interactive way
for generations to come

The client brief was to create a new international digital platform
that would communicate the collection, identification, and curation
of four untold Holocaust testimonies, unseen artefacts, and
previously inaccessible archival materials to an audience of adults
and young people - including teachers and their students - in an
inspiring and user-friendly way.

Rhapsody was responsible for heading the idea, creative
direction, copywriting, web development, and photography.

Our key considerations at concept stage were:

  • How to address the subject
  • The best way to portray each person’s story in a
    unique and respectful manner while also developing
    an appealing and authentic visual identity.

We then moved onto design. We knew we had to create a space
that was engaging to an audience with a wide age range and
differing levels of knowledge around the subject matter, while
making sure the meaning behind each item and journey was kept
front and centre. The challenge was to find this balance and
maintain it throughout every element of the site, from visual
design to tone of voice.

For a seamless user experience, it was imperative that site design
blended function, aesthetics, and history seamlessly. The task was
to create a navigation system that would allow the user to
navigate the narrative while engaging with artefacts, journeys,
and stories. The artefacts therefore became an essential
component of the design.

We started by photographing each person’s artefact before working
on ways to bring them to life, which included creating 360-degree
spinrounds to allow the user explore each one in detail. This then
led to honing-in on each person’s journey, and developing an
interactive map using geocoding navigation to enable users to chart
each one and gain an idea of the varying distances covered.

We then carefully selected typefaces. The body copy, caption,
and quote type are all Nocturne Serif, which was created by
Mateusz Machalski as part of https://kroje.org/. Inspired by
Warsaw and based on local typographic traditions, the typeface
was in fact the backbone of our web design, and a key element
when it came to giving the content a voice.

Tone of voice and language were workshopped with the teams from
the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, National Holocaust Centre and
Museum and the Jewish Museum of Greece to ensure all copy on
the site was informative without being intimidating, while any
potential gaps in user knowledge were addressed via the addition
of pop-out glossary boxes to prevent pages from becoming too
text-heavy.

The website was officially launched at an event attended by over
150 people - including John Hajdu MBE, survivor of the
Holocaust, who shared his personal experiences, and Enver
Solomon, Chief Executive of the Refugee Council, who discussed
refugee experiences past and present, and the relevance of
‘ordinary objects’ - and was incredibly well received.

“Rhapsody blew me away right from the moment we met
them when they pitched to us, notably how they managed
to make a wide variety of websites with different subject
matters engaging, immersive and inclusive. It was
incredible seeing our ideas for the project not just brought
to life, but enhanced, strengthened and advanced by
Rhapsody. We are so thrilled with the final result, and are
confident the website will achieve our goals – to engage
people with Holocaust education, through artefacts, and to
increase knowledge and awareness of the Holocaust. We
are already planning on adding more artefacts to the
website and look forward to continuing our relationship
with Rhapsody – if they can put up with us again!”

Dr Rachel Century – Director of Public Engagement and
Deputy Chief Executive of Holocaust Memorial Day Trust

How can we help?

We’re always open for a chat,
get in touch

Contact

How can we help?

We’re always open for a chat,
get in touch

Contact